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An excerpt, in English and Atlantean, from the comedy "The Bride" by Gildasso, written about 470.

 

(Tuondo Measel is pretending he is not at home, where he is being pursued by his future bride's family. He has had second thoughts about marrying her. He tries to pretend at first that he is his own brother, Fulgo.).

Siphon Meistos (Tuondo's futre brother-in-law):

Come and open the door, Tuondo. We know you're there, and so does your bride - do you hear - your wife!

Thoun Meistos (Tuondo's future father-in-law):

And I know you're in the house - I saw you go in. Yes, there you are - behind that window!

Tuondo Measel (from inside; to himself, in a false voice):

Oh woe, double and triple woe. (Aloud): It's me that's here!

Siphon:

We know - come out.

Tuondo:

No, me, Fulgo, me, not Tuondo, me. I don't know where the other one -er…, where my brother is now. He came in the front door and went out the back. He didn't stay long at all.

Thoun:

Ha, you liar, there isn't a back door to that house!

Tuondo:

No indeed, it's a side door I went out - I mean Tuondo went out. Oh go away, I was sitting quietly here when you came.

Thoun:

There is no side door either. I walked all round that house earlier.

Tuondo:

Oh no, no side door…but I don't know, I wasn't looking anyway. I am just sitting here. Actually I think Tuondo has gone to get Millei a present.

Millei Meistos (Tuondo's bride-to-be):

Oh by God, just wait! When I catch him, I'll shove his present down his throat.

Tuondo:

That's why I look forward…I mean Tuondo looks forward..to marrying you so much.. you lovely woman…as soon as he gets back here. Really I shouldn't wait for him. It will take him a while to find a suitable present for you..a necklace, a chain, a rope…

Thoun:

What is he saying?

Siphon:

You are definitely Tuondo, you deceitful villain!

Tuondo:

Well, a philosopher would say you are right, or partly right, that I am Tuondo. We certainly had one mother and one father. Does that mean I am Tuondo and Tuondo is me? What an interesting question..oh, you gods! (A brick smashes the window).

 

 

The original Atlantean text, with occasional linguistic comments by myself.

 

Saisaxille.

Siphon Meistos (Tuonduyu yoyano enthetto):

Iurg tehetu ei louss tuouthun, Tuondu! Feyens cies aitu ythair e tue feyese tei saisaxille..cir ayenetu..tei enuanaxille!

Thoun Meistos (Tuonduyu yoyano enbenno):

E nia, feyenu cies aitu thesasil - spiccanu teih siurg. Sai, aitu ythair - narcas thain luogratusil!

Tuondo Measel (Ysilil) (Huattethe deihan):

Ayanca neih, buoayanca, darayanca! (Zourehe: huattethe brouehe): Nie ainu ythia, nie! [Brouehe has a slightly irregular declension; it appears as "broul" below.]

Siphon:

Feyens - Iurg tehetu yruter!

Tuondo:

Deh, nie, Fulgo, nie, dehles Tuondo, nie! Defeyenu ycul nie - til broul - ou - ycul nei thetto aith ian. [Note the loss of final "e" in "aith", a colloquialism. Also in literary language this verb would be in the subjunctive after "defeyenu", "I don't know"]. Siurgathe yoyuyun tuouthar ed enturgathe nithuyun. Dehe sainathe louanan.

Thoun:

A, nithuatton, eanethe denu nithuyu tuouthu thain thesasil!

Tuondo:

Deh sunto, renduyun tuouthaos enturgenanu, nie.. huattehenu enturgathe Tuondo. As, urg tehetes ente 
[ "Ente" is added separately here, colloquially, to stress the meaning: "away"]
! Ithahuasen sononduehe ythia yaincu iurgates.

Thoun:

Eanethe tue denu renduyu tuouthu. Dittul bainanu fent thain tontan thesasil.

Tuondo:

A deh, denu renduyu tuouthu… per defeyenu, ditont ai dehainspiccanu. Ithenu ythia. Sunto pethenu cies [more fromally this would have been: "peth(eth)e neih cies..] Tuondo tehe enturgaxa [again less colloquial speech would require "deucies" inserted here ("in order that")] exehe rett Millei enan dainsan.

Millei Meistos (Tuonduyu yoyane saisaxille):

A dai, mensun tehe. Yaincu naphenu deih, teheanu duaic [the colloquial way of indicating the future; the formal way would be "duaicceanu"] dei dainsan unt yuhun!

Tuondo:

Thaotha diapethenu…huattehenu diapethethe Tuondo…ed enien teih dorse meuhe… meisena suayinda..ul ianan ul iurgethe ythia. Sunto mensunehen heih dehles toutaue. Louanan detrouldeathe teih enuan dansan…enun lernamun, enan buotaphesabban, enun zailtsun…

Thoun:

Huas huattethe thea?

Siphon:

Aitu sunto Tuondo, nithensiesul daimon!

Tuondo:

Tei, en saiphon saisethe huatteth cies rehuattetu, zou ditontehe, cies ainu Tuondo. Sunto yaindans enan mannan ed enun bennun. Cir huattehethe cies nia ainu Tuondo e Tuondo aitu nie? Ye irtounondur aithe thio erpisso…Dai! (En coust raoccethe luogratun).

 

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